Environmental sustainability

The Faculty of Science and Engineering is committed to environmental sustainability within its processes, its teaching and its research.

Many of our Schools have teams working towards, or who have gained Green Impact Awards demonstrating that they have evaluated their work environments and actively made changes to improve the sustainability of that space whether it be a lab space, an office, and for some ambitious team, a whole building! 

For staff who are interested in environmental sustainability at work, the Faculty hosts a termly network lunch so that staff can get together, share best practice and work together on initiatives that are larger than just their own team.

Below are two stories of staff whose work has made a difference to environmental sustainability 

 

Alice Larkin , Professor of Climate Science and Energy Policy (Tyndall Manchester) School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering

See Alice and her colleague Kevin Anderson discussing their contribution at COP21 the Paris Climate Change Conference in 2015.

Alice’s research field is climate change mitigation.  She made a major contribution to the development of the UK’s Climate Change Act, and influenced the inclusion of aviation within the EU’s Emissions Trading Scheme. These contributions were delivered through her public, policy and industry engagement activities that ran in parallel to her academic research activity.
Alice addressed policymakers parliamentary select committees not only in Westminster, but additionally in the Northern Irish Assembly in Stormont, Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh and the European Parliament in Strasbourg. She has addressed industry stakeholders, through invited presentations and research workshops, as well as civil society audiences through public lectures, museum events, TV, radio and print media interviews and articles.  At the same time, she has been publishing on tackling CO2 reduction in shipping, aviation and food-systems.   Alice's newer research on shipping is also starting to deliver impactful change beneficial to society – with an International Maritime Organisation meeting receiving a call from the Marshall Islands – the world’s third largest ship registry – for CO2 targets for shipping, based on her and colleagues analysis: http://bit.ly/1IPZt7Y.

Specifically, Alice's highlights the vast gulf between the mitigation efforts of nations, and the implications this has not only for future climate impacts, but also how industrialised nations tend to overlook the central importance of ‘equity’ within the debate.

Alice gave a TED Global presentation delivered at the Royal Institution, her talk specifically highlights the societal inequities posed by the climate change challenge.

Laurence Stamford, Chemical Engineer 

In his everyday practice, and in his research, teaching and public engagement work, Laurence helps to make a difference to environmental sustainability. Some of Laurence’s endeavours to environmental sustainability include spearheading the Green Impact scheme within the School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, which led to a School-wide switch to recycled paper and delivering numerous sustainability-related talks to the public.

In the last year, Laurence has initiated and led the switch in the School’s paper supplies from non-recycled, non-certified A4 to 100% recycled, FSC-certified paper at no additional cost. By coordinating with the School’s Stores department, Central Stores and the internal Environmental and Social Responsibility Group, this change has been fully implemented. The change affects 2 million sheets (10 tonnes) or A4 per year with a total carbon footprint of around 8,500 kg CO2- equivalent.

Laurence also started the first Green Impact Team in CEAS (the Sustainable Industrial Systems team) and delivered talks and activities on the sustainability of energy systems at Manchester Science Festival (2015 & 2016), Runshaw College (January 2016), Manchester Museum’s ‘Climate Control’ programme (July 2016) and NERC’s ‘Into the Blue’ event (October 2016).

 

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